Keynotes

 Professor of Applied Quantitative Analysis,
Director of Industrial Liaison,
Director of the Centre for Cryptocurrency Research and Engineering
in the Department of Computing, Imperial College London, UK

Bio:

William Knottenbelt is Professor of Applied Quantitative Analysis, Director of Industrial Liaison, and Director of the Centre for Cryptocurrency Research and Engineering in the Department of Computing at Imperial College London, where he became a Lecturer in 2000.  He has co-authored more than 200 scientific papers, is an editor of Performance Evaluation Journal, and has served as general or program chair of numerous conferences and workshops related to quantitative modelling and/or cryptocurrencies, most recently ACM/SPEC ICPE 2024 and IEEE ICBC 2024. A keen supporter of student-led innovation, he is technical advisor to a number of start ups including Deep Render, Aventus and DeepSearch Labs.
Abstract: 
In proof-of-work blockchains, difficulty regulates the rate at which blocks are produced by miners in an effort to avoid producing new units of cryptocurrency too quickly. Over the years, several different algorithms for adjusting difficulty have been proposed, some of which have led to severe problems such as oscillation in the Bitcoin Cash. The recent bitcoin halving took place around 8 months ahead of the ideal schedule. In this talk we take a look at the state of the art in this area, and propose a new algorithm which is able to adjust difficulty on a block-by-block basis while keeping block production close to an ideal schedule.

Professor of Business Analytics at Southampton Business School, the University of Southampton, UK
Member of the Centre for Operational Research, Management Science and Information Systems (CORMSIS),
Director of Internationalisation at Southampton Business School

Bio:

Stephan Onggo is a Professor of Business Analytics at Southampton Business School, the University of Southampton and a member of the Centre for Operational Research, Management Science and Information Systems (CORMSIS). Currently, he holds the position of Director of Internationalisation at Southampton Business School. He serves as an Associate Editor (Agent-Based Simulation) for the Journal of Simulation, Area Editor (Simulation) for Flexible Services and Manufacturing Journal, and a General Council member of The OR Society. His research interests lie in the areas of simulation and its interface with other Data Analytics methods. He is particularly interested in simulation modelling methodology (symbiotic simulation/digital twin, hybrid modelling, agent-based simulation, discrete-event simulation, simulation optimisation) and its applications in the management of supply chain, health care and disaster. He was the Principal Investigator of an EPSRC funded project to designing a resilient relief supply network for natural disasters in West Java Indonesia using optimisation-via-simulation (Relief-OpS) and the co-Investigator of an EPSRC funded project to improve the community resilience and sustainability through Operational Research capacity building in Southeast Asia (CREST-OR)